Create the Right Content for Your Market and Win More Deals

Content marketing attracts new customers by helping people solve problems they’re having related to your service’s buying cycle. Do it right, and your would-be customers will find you faster and have more reason to choose you over your competition.

Research Your Market

To create content your target customers want to read, you need to know what they’re planning. Building permit data can give you a lot of insight into what your local homeowners and property developers are up to. For example, you might find quite a few kitchen renovation permits have been issued recently in middle-class neighborhoods. Knowing this, you can assume these homeowners are in the market for new, mid-range countertops, cabinets, and appliances.

If you sell one of these products, you might create content on choosing budget-friendly options that stand up to wear. If you’re a general contractor who handles renovations and remodeling, content on prioritizing expenditures and planning a kitchen layout are good bets. As your potential clients research their projects online, they’ll find your content and come to see you as the kind of helpful, knowledgeable provider they want to work with.

Focus on Buyers

It’s a common mistake to focus on topics that attract the most visitors, whether or not those visitors are potential buyers. To avoid this, consider the topics your ideal customers will research as part of the buying process. Think through the questions and problems they might have, and the decisions they’ll need to make. Then create content that provides valuable guidance on those topics. While this level of focus might bring you fewer visitors overall, the visitors you do attract will be more profitable.

If you’re a roofing contractor or roof truss manufacturer, an article on the history of roofing styles in early New England might attract plenty of architecture students, but few paying clients. Change that to The Pros and Cons of Common New England Roof Styles, though, and you’ll bring in people planning a new build or a roof replacement.

For more tips on creating content that attracts your ideal customers, contact us at Construction Monitor.

Do You Really Need to Develop a Buyer Persona?

Creating buyer personas helps you better understand your ideal clients so you can market to them more effectively and spot future business opportunities. They aren’t the only way to define your audience, though.

How Buyer Personas Help Guide Your Business

A detailed profile of the type of client you want to work with makes it easier to understand your target clients as fully fleshed-out individuals. You’re no longer targeting “property developers,” but 45-year-old John who has personal wants, needs, interests, likes, and dislikes that go beyond construction. With this information, you can create marketing that connects with your ideal clients on a deeper level and sets you apart from the competition.

The insight your buyer personas provide helps you decide where your future clients spend their time and what they do there, so you’ll know how to reach them and turn them into leads. If they’re more likely to be on Facebook than LinkedIn, it’s clear where your advertising money should go. Developing future services is also easier when you have a good idea of what your target clients are interested in and what they have and haven’t been satisfied with in past construction projects.

Other Ways to Understand Your Audience

If buyer personas don’t sound like your thing, get to know your target audience better first by defining their problems, then by deciding what solutions you can offer for them. Start by gathering basic information on your target audience. If you want to work with property developers who invest in multifamily housing, find out approximately how many of them are in your area.

Next, consider their goals and challenges, and what they’re ultimately hoping to achieve with their projects. Maybe they’re looking for distinctive architectural features that command higher prices or they’re interested in alternative construction methods that allow for lower-cost housing that sells faster. To better define your niche, look at where your target clients’ needs and wants overlap with your skills.

How to Earn the Attention of Your Target Audience

target audience attentionIt’s not always easy to get your content to stand out in the sea of information out there these days, but it can be done. Take the time to understand your ideal construction clients’ concerns and interests, give them what they’re looking for, and you’ll have no trouble holding their attention.

Focus on Their Interests

The first step in earning your audience’s attention is to focus on the topics they care about most. If your target clients are hungry to learn about converting old warehouses into modern office buildings, they’ll happily pay attention to your blog posts on renewing facades and retrofitting modern technology. If warehouse conversion isn’t their thing, though, they’ll ignore that content no matter how good it is.

Even if you’re fairly certain you know what your prospects want, continual research helps you spot shifting trends and topics you might have overlooked. What topics do your prospects and clients often ask about? Which articles and blog posts on your site are most popular? What kinds of social media posts in your field get the most attention? A little old-fashion keyword research can help you spot in-demand topics, too.

Offer Real Benefits

Long gone are the days when you could dash off a cursory, keyword-laden blog post and expect it to bring in leads. Today’s readers won’t stick around for content that doesn’t genuinely benefit them. The complexities of the construction industry make for an especially demanding audience. Your potential clients need help understanding popular construction features, modern building materials, and ever-evolving building codes.

If your content answers their questions, solves their problems or gives them valuable new knowledge, your audience will pay attention and keep coming back to learn more. Cover topics in depth and include hard data, well-sourced facts, and visual aids such as diagrams and graphs. Offer your personal, experience-based insights readers can’t get elsewhere. Share your opinions and humor, too. Your true personality will hold your audience’s attention better than a bland corporate voice.

How People-Based Marketing Can Boost Engagement

people based marketingWith so many ways for your clients to interact with your construction firm both online and off, it can be hard to present a consistent, personalized message. People-based marketing lets you tie your marketing data back to individuals, so you can speak directly to them in a way that gets a response.

Focus on the Individual

People-based marketing involves tracking an individual wherever they interact with your business so you can provide a more cohesive, customized experience. Imagine Tom, a 35-year-old homeowner, finds your site while researching remodelers on his iPhone during his lunch break. When he gets home, he joins your email list from his laptop. Later in the week, he calls you for more information.

With traditional methods, all you’ll have is data showing that someone interacted with your firm on mobile, on a laptop, and offline. People-based marketing lets you connect your data to individuals, giving you a clearer view of how they interact with you so you can give them an experience that’s in tune with their needs and interests. Instead of marketing to 30-something homeowners in general, you can market directly to Tom.

Provide Content that Gets Attention

When your visitors get what they want from your online content, they have more incentive to stick around and engage with you.

Recommend blog posts that resonate with them and you’ll get more comments. If those blog posts touch on issues related to groups your visitor is a part of, you’ll get more social media shares, too. When you find just the right moment to suggest joining your email list, you’ll see more sign-ups. Promptly follow up with your recent clients, and chances are you’ll receive more positive online reviews. Better yet, you’ll no longer have to risk annoying your prospects with interruptive ads.

The more time your prospects spend interacting with your firm, the stronger a relationship you can build, and the more likely you are to see a sale.

 

How To Formulate An Accurate Buyer Persona

buyer personaHaving a clear picture of the type of person who’s likely to hire your construction firm makes it a lot easier to reach that individual in the real world. To do its job, though, a buyer persona must be accurate.

Collect Your Data

Using hard data on your ideal clients’ demographics, psychographics, behavior, and goals is the most effective way to ensure your buyer personas reflect reality. Data from construction market research firms offers a starting point. This can tell you things such as the ages and income brackets of the average commercial real estate investor.

The more valuable data, however, will come from your own customers. Start by analyzing data your already have, such as information from your sales history, CRM system, website analytics, and reviews.

If you need more data, client surveys and focus groups can help you get it. To learn more about your ideal clients’ online behavior, such as which blogs they read and which forums they post on, take some time to browse their social media profiles. Interviewing your sales team can also turn up some interesting insights.

Get Specific

Chances are, there are several distinct types of people who hire you for construction work. Cramming all your data into one buyer persona for your entire company will only give you a muddled image that represents no one in particular.

Instead, break down and organize your data to create buyer personas that sound like real people with specific backgrounds, lifestyles, and interests. Your ideal remodeling client might be a newly married 30-year-old software developer who needs space to grow a family. On the other hand, your commercial real estate investor persona might be a 50-year-old accounting firm owner looking for more freedom in his life.

For even greater accuracy, develop several personas for each type of service your offer. One of your remodeling personas might be a newlywed while the other is an older empty-nester.

 

3 Key Ways To Make Your Marketing Strategy Customer-centric

customer-centric strategyThe key to developing an effective marketing strategy doesn’t lie in analyzing data or researching your competition, but in focusing on your customers’ needs. By putting your customer at the heart of your marketing strategy, you let them know you’re the firm for them.

Create buyer personas – Raw data can’t drive an effective marketing strategy, but it can definitely help. Use what you know about your ideal clients to create profiles for two to five client types. Depending on your specialty, you might have “John the commercial real estate investor” or “Ann the rental property developer.” List what you know about their demographics, psychographics, goals, and habits related to their professional and personal lives. Well fleshed-out buyer personas give you a clear view of the people you’re trying to reach and build a rapport with.

Personalize your communication – These days, just using software to stick your prospect’s first name in your emails is weak effort. There are much more effective ways to get the right message to the right prospect. The first step is to segment your email list according to the services they’re interested in, as well as factors such as location or budget. To further tailor your message to each prospect’s interests, set up event-triggered email campaigns. The emails could be triggered by a search your prospect performed on your website, a free report they downloaded or even a blog post they read.

Grow with your client in mind – When you’re ready to expand into new services and specialties, get input from your client base first. Whether through surveys, focus groups or one-to-one chats with your favorite clients, find out whether your plans are in line with what your current and potential clients need and want. With the insight you gain, you’ll be able to develop new services that show your clients you care enough to listen to them. Better yet, you’ll avoid sinking time and money into something that won’t sell.

 

Targeted Marketing In The Construction Industry

targeted marketingBefore they trust you with their construction projects, your would-be clients want to know you understand the unique demands of their segment of the market. Targeted marketing helps you communicate your valuable specialized expertise, while also making more efficient use of your time and resources to bring in more and better qualified leads.

Define Your Ideal Clients

To more effectively target your marketing, start by breaking the construction market down into the segments that are most profitable for you, given your skillset, and that offer a high potential for growth. First consider the larger segments, primarily:

  • Private
  • Public
  • Industrial
  • Commercial

Then focus in on smaller segments, such as private housing, public education facilities or commercial office buildings. This makes it easier to fine-tune your marketing message to address the concerns of your ideal clients within each of these verticals.

If you focus on commercial office building construction, you might adapt your marketing to emphasis your expertise in issues such energy-efficiency for reduced operating costs and features that win higher rents and occupancy.

To further define your target market, segment by geography. Targeting regions with higher population densities, strong economic growth, and an active construction scene can bring you more leads for less effort.

Reach Out the Right Way

Once you have a clear idea of who you’re trying to reach, you can more accurately determine which marketing channels will reach them effectively. This kind of targeted marketing gives you a better return on your investment than a generalist, scattershot approach.

Consider the kind of information and entertainment your ideal clients look for on a daily basis. What websites do they frequent? Which newspapers and magazines do they read? What TV and radio programs are they drawn to?

If you’re trying to connect with commercial real estate developers, business investment magazines and newspapers are a good bet. If residential construction is your specialty, real estate investment websites and magazines can help you get your firm’s name in front of your ideal clients.

To learn more about attracting leads through targeted marketing, contact Construction Monitor.