Using Permit Data to Uncover Contracting Business Opportunities

permit data

Most construction industry companies depend on new business to maintain or increase profits. Using permit data can take your lead generations in surprising directions. But you must use building permit information with intent.

Contractors, Subcontractors: Using Permit Data Works

Construction contractors and subcontractors fall into basic categories and those include everything from Tom Sawyer painting his aunt’s fence (obviously a non-union job) to working on power lines, sheet metal, highway grading, underwater rock removal… OSHA has a detailed list of major construction groups.

You have plenty of “good old” tools – referrals are a great example. Take that from yesterday’s word-of-mouth to online testimonials, and you have possibly the most powerful tool trending for developing new business. Using permit data generates building permit information that generates leads. You can get weekly or monthly updates.

Frequency is important but what’s most important about using permit data is knowing how to use it. Basic information starts with the type of project; solar, swimming pool, renovation, new-build, razing, etc. Most recently, security installations are a trending type of construction project; most involve electricians but some require more detailed contractors.

Building permit information also includes:

  • Contact information for contractors, owners/other important project partners
  • Project location, address
  • Project start date, permit number
  • Project value

It Works if You Work It

Construction Monitor uses a powerful search engine to filter information. Remodeling

“Building your own home” once meant a homeowner would apply for a building permit before hiring a builder. Construction companies that were experienced using permit data would quickly introduce themselves to the project owners.

Today, contractors use building permit information to ease-out the competition by tracking top companies’ bids. They analyze historical data. They align themselves with smaller companies looking for mentorship and seek alliances with other contractors.

Marketing strategies can be developed using permit data alone. It’s not rocket science, but it’s a job. If you’re too busy to put the information to work, it would better serve your company to dedicate one person to the task. Our Support team can help you get started.

Contact, email, or call Construction Monitor today, 800-925-6085 (international callers: 435-586-1205).

9 Tips for Getting Your Contracting Business Through COVID-19

Contracting Business

The National Law Review offers this piece of advice for your contracting business: Get it in writing!¹ That’s especially true during the coronavirus pandemic that is threatening our nation’s population and economic health.

Coronavirus vs. Your Contracting Business

This situation is here and now. It changes every day, so if you had an optimistic 5-year plan for your organization, toss it away and get ready to move quickly. 

Here are 9 tips to get your contracting business through COVID-19:

  1. Be proactive – If you’re silent, clients and employees become extra-nervous. Communicate with emails and online how you’re managing this event. Share due diligence efforts and business recovery plans.
  2. Communicate early – By now you should have reached out to all project stakeholders to review terms of performance, timelines and costs. Strive to keep projects alive and get everything in writing.
  3. Consider mobility implementations – If administrative and back-office personnel can work from home, consider making the move to a mobile workforce.
  4. Contract modifications – Every project contract you have in the works needs to return to the table. Try to recover or offset rising costs.
  5. Coronavirus impact – The time to “wait and see” is past. Your contracts should have included “excusable delays” or “force majeure” clauses. Provide notice to all contract-holders how coronavirus has impacted contract deliverables, including supply chain issues. Cite all time/performance delays, real and predicted.
  6. Cybersecurity – If administrative people will be working from home, you may need to upgrade cybersecurity and educate them about not compromising confidential information.
  7. Prepare for new workplace safety requirements – Your employees will need masks and/or gloves to reduce virus cross-contamination.
  8. Put it in writing – Document every communication, every delay, every challenge… If you weren’t the kind of person to keep a “diary,” you need to start. Others are depending on you to show diligence in trying to salvage work.
  9. Update policies for paid days off/sick days – This is going to be a tricky area. Employees must not be “punished” for staying home when sick, but your guidelines must also be reasonable. Consult with HR and/or legal professionals to revise employment terms.

Construction Monitor is Here for You

What’s happening now is temporary, but it will change the way we do business forever. Your contracting business can prepare for growth, even while time seemingly stands still. Call 800-925-6085 or contact us to learn more about using construction data reports.

We wish continued good health for you and your company.