Construction Industry JHA Process Ineffective?

Construction Industry

Construction safety is a risk you can manage. The JHA (job safety analysis) program was needed to identify and mitigate or eliminate workplace hazards by stimulating employee buy-in to safety. A recent JHA process study by the CPWR (Center for Construction Research and Training) submits:

  • Complacency
  • Ineffective communication from management
  • Isolation of upper management from jobs
  • Lack of input and buy-in from workers

…make the JHA process ineffective.

Thirty JHA documents were examined and 23 interviews with the safety professionals from representative construction industry businesses were conducted. 

The study revealed most companies’ safety documentations have no:

  • Information for contacting JHA
  • References for control recommendations
  • Risk assessment matrix
  • Visual representations

And despite the fact that paper documentation fails to be effective, most small-company safety professionals use paper input anyway. CPWR suggested rotating JHA leaders to empower employees. They also recommended improving JHA content and including visual aids to make safety information easier to understand.

We Need to Adjust Construction Industry Safety Mindsets

We spent time each morning completing the JHA and having people sign it. Nothing ever came from it. -Construction superintendent

Safety professional Tricia Kagerer says it’s time to reframe risk. Kagerer says by moving from the JHA model to one that includes Daily Planning Conversations (DPC), construction industry leaders will have the chance to “reframe” how we view risk by using leadership communication to improve preplanning and prevent incidents. Every day.

The JHA process is filled with good intentions. When utilized in conjunction with the Foundation for Safety Leadership (FSL) program and DPC, leaders are learning construction workers prefer focusing on safety protection through technology rather than prevention awareness. And safety professionals find real value in their work.

Technologies to promote safety include:

  • Artificial intelligence
  • Drones
  • GPS electronics
  • Machine learning
  • Natural language processing
  • Onsite security cameras
  • Safety software
  • Wearables

Adopting construction technology is a challenge for many companies. They are concerned about difficulty of use. And will it be utilized or become an investment that didn’t pan out?

Our business permit data is sorted before it’s sent to you. We make sure it’s easy to use. You can seek support any time, so make the call today and let’s discuss ways you can use our technology.

Call 800.925.6085 (international/435.586.1205) or contact Construction Monitor.

Managing Construction Safety With Software

construction safety

There’s been a lot of speculation and discussion about this year’s evolution of the construction industry. We’re going to grow more, spend more, do more in 2022 than we have in a long time. We’re facing many challenges, too, but the one thing we know for sure is: It could be worse. Much worse. Our technology investments will impact construction safety in 2022.

Construction Technology, Software Investments in the Field

A 2022 industry outlook study revealed construction industry companies are poised to invest more in software and construction technology this year. Construction technology impacts onsite project construction safety:

  • AI – Artificial intelligence software on job sites prevents accidents by providing real-time monitoring of safety risks.
    • Power gloves can reduce hand injuries due to overuse by providing artificial – but effective – strength to workers’ grips.
    • Smart hard hats – You know what it feels like: Microsleep is when you’re not asleep but not fully awake. Smart hard hats can detect brain waves and reduce the risks of injury to workers.
    • Wearables/virtual reality sensors mounted on equipment features allow smart boots to sound an alert if a worker is dangerously at-risk.
  • Data collection – This software performs safety analyses and equipment conditions.
  • Drones – Safety and security can be monitored and managed in real-time.

Environment, Health, and Safety Software

Research from Liberty Mutual found that non-fatal injuries cost
companies more than $1 billion per week
. –Construction Dive

Environment, health, and safety (EHS) management software tracks trends and performance, risks, and challenges so project managers can make knowledge-based decisions. This software also makes staying in compliance with constantly changing safety regulations easier:

  • Mobile-device friendly views
  • Onsite data is accessible by every level of management
  • OSHA/other regulatory standards captured; easier auditing processes
  • Safety reporting is faster/easier

Before You Buy: Ask Questions

Follow our 9 Questions To Ask When Seeking Construction Software when you consider this year’s software investment. Add to those questions: How will this software reduce risk and increase construction safety?

If you have questions about Construction Monitor’s software results for your company, contact a Construction Monitor marketing professional.

How’s Your Construction Safety Culture?

construction safety

The pandemic changed the playing field for everyone. It definitely changed the safety culture for construction industry worksites. We were considered “essential workers,” but jobsites and office closures did substantial damage.

Back at work, we had to develop a new way of working; a more proactive safety culture. Did our industry do it? Did your company do it?

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) decided a safety culture should include a human health approach. You may size up workers’ fitness for a job by observing their physical strength; making sure they have the right protective gear and equipment. ABC’s Greg Sizemore says, “You need to look at the heart and mind in addition to the physical.”

Construction Safety Policies

It appears construction companies with a robust safety culture also have several commonalities. They often have:

  • A substance abuse policy that is emphasized and backed by drug/alcohol testing when possible
  • Intense safety focus that includes emotional health as well as physical
  • Leadership and management that visibly follow construction safety protocols and programs
  • New-hire training and onboarding that focuses special attention to policies and expectations
  • Regularly scheduled toolbox talks that include reminders of or focus on construction safety

What You Can Do: Get Back to the Basics

If your safety culture is off-course and you want to get it back on track for 2022, Environmental, Health, and Safety Advisor editor Jay Kumar says you can start by getting back to the basics. Begin by reviewing OSHA’s Construction Safety & Injury Prevention workbook. Several steps are key to fostering change in your company’s safety culture:

  1. Define the need for change
  2. Commit to a construction safety culture
  3. Assess current safety program(s)
  4. Strategically plan
  5. Focus on incident control – your goal is 0% incidents
  6. Communicate the change and implement the goals 
  7. Measure and analyze the results

Sometimes, getting back to the basics strengthens moving forward. It’s a solid strategy that works.

If your marketing strategy is stale, maybe it’s time to start at the beginning. Building permit analytics is the beginning of a marketing strategy that leads to winning bids and forming profitable alliances. Contact Construction Monitor to learn how.

Construction Safety Programs Can Lower Insurance Expenses

Construction Safety Programs

Risk management is the process of identifying, evaluating, and controlling threats. These risks can be dangers to your company, personnel, or financial well-being. They can be natural disasters, for which you can assign probability ratios.

Security threats and on-the-job accidents are risks you can minimize or even eliminate with strategic management. Construction safety is a risk you can manage. And it might even reduce your insurance costs.

Construction Safety Prioritization and Better Workers’ Comp Costs

Construction is usually considered a high-risk liability for insurance companies. When accidents and injuries occur, it can take years to settle because of the numerous, complex contracts between contractors, which usually include liability assumptions language.

RBN Insurance professionals Blair Koorsen and Jeff Greenhalgh say one way for contractors to offset rising insurance costs is to secure more favorable workers’ compensation premiums. Proactive management and workplace risk reductions are key.

Documented Safety Programs

This gives you an advantage in recruiting new hires, especially in a competitive market. But it can actually enhance safety protocols and awareness. It can protect workers. When employees feel valued, you’ll see greater productivity. Implementing documented safety programs can reduce injuries by 15%-35%.

Steps To Lower Insurance Costs

Read OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) standards pertaining to your company, your workforce, and your state. Safety programs should be customized to fit your company’s size and culture. Share your safety program information with your insurance carrier(s) and OSHA. Your safety program should include:

  • Education/training
    • Employee inclusion
    • Hazard identification/assessment
    • Hazard prevention
    • How to report concerns
    • Procedures for injury reporting
  • Leadership investment
  • Program evaluation/ongoing improvement

“Documented safety programs can help insurance carriers view your organization more favorably,” say Koorsen and Greenhalgh. “Most importantly, make sure to partner with an insurance and risk management professional who understands your business and its unique risks…and will advocate on your behalf.”

Construction Monitor: Your Business Development Resource

We’re in the business of providing customized analytics that can make money for your business. But we can’t help you if you don’t communicate your needs. Do that today. Contact Construction Monitor.

Construction Safety: Talking the Talk

construction safety

Maybe the most important aspect of promoting construction safety on the jobsite is encouraging proactivity. The construction industry was primarily (and still is) developed and staffed by men. And real men keep their mouths shut, right?

Wrong. It’s time to say something when you see a potential safety hazard. If a co-worker is doing something dangerous, it’s your business. Construction safety is everybody’s business.

Seven Tips for Construction Safety Toolbox Talks

Toolbox talks are informal gatherings at which construction safety is the main topic. The leader should ensure the atmosphere is such that workers feel comfortable enough to comment or ask questions.

Here are seven tips for leading construction safety toolbox talks:

  1. Choose a Good Location – Find a quiet, low-traffic area onsite.
  2. Don’t Forget Health – Health isn’t an oh-by-the-way topic. It has a significant outcome on safety. Perhaps alternate health-and-safety topics; every other gathering, make health the focal point.
  3. Keep It Short/Simple – Your timeframe goal is 15 minutes. If it runs longer because attendees have questions and issues, allow time for those that need it and let others feel free to return to work. Stay on-topic – construction safety. Don’t use the time for other information or issues.
  4. Reinforce a Safety Culture – Encourage workers to express ideas for and concerns about jobsite safety. And if they see a red flag, speak up. On a construction worksite, silence isn’t golden. It can be deadly, in fact.
  5. Strive for Relevance – If scaffolding work is scheduled for that day, talk about safety measures for working heights.
  6. Take Attendance – Make note of attendees and document attendance.
  7. Use Visuals – If possible, adding visual media adds impact to your message.

Summer 2021 may prove to be a banner season for the construction industry. Right now, we have the fourth-highest unemployment rate, but look for that to change this summer. 

Our priority at Construction Monitor is to provide information you can use. Time management, efficiency, business development – those are topics we can speak to. Contact us for more information you can use.

And as you head into what may be one of the busiest seasons in recent history, make construction safety a topic you can speak to.

Stand Down To Prevent Falls: Construction Safety 2021

construction safety

May 3-7, 2021, was the 8th annual National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) promotes this week to encourage construction safety 24/7 all year, every year.

Falls are the greatest challenge to construction safety. Injuries dramatically impact workers’ lives. But families and businesses also suffer when there’s a fall-related accident.

Employers are responsible for providing safe workplaces. We also have a responsibility to provide safety education to employees at every project site. OSHA’s function is to set safety standards and guidelines for workplace safety.

What You Can Do To Promote Construction Safety

In addition to reducing fall hazards and providing safety information, another valuable measure to increase construction safety is to encourage workers to report any fall or other safety risks they see. A Safety Stand-Down is an opportunity and not an obligation because most of us feel responsible for employee safety.

Who Participates In a Safety Stand-Down?

Project managers can take advantage of this opportunity to discuss project-specific hazards and risks. It’s also a good time to document rescue plans.

Construction safety programs or “toolbox talks” can be sponsored or supported by:

  • Construction companies of every size
  • Employee interest organizations
  • General industry employers
  • Government entities
  • Highway construction companies
  • Industry institutes
  • Safety equipment manufacturers
  • Sub-/independent contractors
  • Trade associations
  • Unions

Go to the Stop-Falls Events site to learn where and when programs are available in your region or contact your regional manager. If your company has developed a fall-prevention program, needs additional information, or has suggestions, you can email oshastanddown@dol.gov or access social media sites with #StandDown4Safety.

Construction Monitor genuinely cares about on-the-job safety. If you have safety-related information we should share with construction employers or other industry-related businesses, please email Construction Monitor and we’ll promptly reply.

Building Permit Data Management

You can process large amounts of permit data through Construction Monitor’s API or automated weekly data dumps via secure FTP. To learn more, call 800-925-6085 (international 435-586-1205) or contact us.

Falls Remain Biggest Challenge to Construction Safety

construction safety

One new technology is believed to go a long way to increase construction safety. A long way up, that is. Recently, two skyscraper building projects used enhanced cocoon robotic technology to make their projects safer and faster.

A “robot” that hydraulically scales the side of a high-rise building drops walkways for workers. As workers complete the steel framework for each level, the walkways provide stability and serve as a construction safety device. After several floors have been steel-structured, the machine retracts the walkways and begins its upward trek again, leaving new walkways for workers.

Cocoon Technology Rises to the Next Level

The Self-Climbing Kokoon® can climb two floors (27´) in four hours. As its name implies, it’s completely self-climbing and no operators or additional equipment is needed for operation. It has its own built-in generator.

“Self-Climbing Kokoon provides the highest level of protection on the market,” says Italian engineering firm Despe S.p.A.

Self-Climbing Kokoon was designed to:

  • Add 35 sq. ft. of additional usable space for a building with a 700´ perimeter (and 47 square feet of advertising space)
  • Enhance access to construction operations
  • Free up your crane for other work
  • Improve construction accuracy
  • Keep workers safe
  • Offer easy access to tools, equipment, and storage
  • Prevent objects from falling
  • Provide complete perimeter protection and perform steel erection operations inside a protective cocoon
  • Save time

In Dubai, a skyscraper project used this technology to make elevator installation work easier. The device drilled holes to set anchor bolts for the elevator guide rails and landing doors.

Marketing Management With Construction Monitor

The marketing professionals at Construction Monitor believe sharing any information that promotes construction safety is helpful. We want to also improve your company’s health. Ask us how to structure a marketing plan using our building permit data and technology tools.

Call 800-925-6085 (international 435-586-1205) or contact us for more information.

Construction Safety Checklist

construction safety checklist

The American National Standards Institute and the American Society of Safety Professionals (ANSI/ASSP) revised the A10 Construction and Demolition Operations standards in addition to Fall Protection and Restraint (Z359) guidelines. We should follow their construction safety protocols.

The 2020 construction safety standards revisions were chaired by Richard Hislop. “This is more than putting a cover over a hole or placing a barricade around a hazard. This is about creating a process to manage safety.”

Basic Checklist for Construction Safety

Construction safety policies’ importance can’t be over-emphasized. Construction safety should be owned by everyone in the industry and on the job.

To download the complete form, go to Get the Checklist. Some of its project construction safety tips include:

  1. Appoint a safety/health supervisor.
  2. Develop a health/safety plan and communicate it to employees.
  3. Ensure employees are trained/aware of hazards/controls, safety/health rules required by the project-specific safety and health plan.
  4. Ensure compliance with ANSI/ASSP A10.33-2020; hazardous conditions are promptly abated.
  5. Provide employees with personal protective equipment. Ensure they are trained in its use.
  6. Train employees to safely operate machinery, tools, vehicles, and equipment.
  7. Notify workers they must be fit for duty/free from impairment from medications, illegal substances/alcohol. Assess fitness for duty before each shift.
  8. Recommend appropriate discipline if employees violate safety/health rules and provide recognition for employees who achieve safety and health goals and demonstrate valuable health and safety behaviors.
  9. Conduct/manage daily safety/health inspections. Document/correct hazardous conditions.
  10. Inspect machinery/tools, vehicles/equipment before use at the beginning of each shift to ensure they are free from hazards.
  11. Ensure workers report injuries and have access to first aid supplies.
  12. Document all work-related injuries/illnesses/near misses. Investigate/implement preventive construction safety measures.
  13. Train workers in the emergency action plan (evacuation, etc.)
  14. Stop work if imminent danger is present.
  15. Ensure employees have access to water/bathrooms.

Construction Monitor Increases Profits With Building Permit Data

You’re already managing pandemic protocols to keep workers safe. Hopefully, that’s a temporary process. But our industry’s drive to promote project safety will continue forever.

Make this the year you build your reputation for construction safety; you’ll become the company talented recruits want to join.

Construction Monitor helps companies like yours build business. And we genuinely care about your marketing outcomes. Let us know how building permits have increased your profits. And if you don’t know how to use building permit data, ask us.

Keeping Construction Equipment Cool in Hot Weather

construction equipment

It’s going to be warmer than usual throughout much of the U.S. this summer. In your continuing efforts to keep jobsite workers safe and cool, don’t neglect your construction equipment. Machinery downtime can cost.

Construction Equipment Maintenance is Vital to Our Industry

OSHA says the construction industry leads in workplace-related injuries and deaths. Many accidents are caused by equipment malfunctions that could be avoided.

It’s never too late to begin calendaring construction equipment maintenance. Review manufacturer’s maintenance recommendations. Reconstruct past maintenance for older construction equipment as you begin a new schedule. As always, when red flags are raised or regulatory agencies review a project, conscientious bookkeeping prevails. It’s proven diligence for construction companies.

  • Coolants/antifreeze levels – Improper balance can lead to problems with other fluid systems and cause inhibitors to precipitate out. This can lead to greater degradation of metal components.
  • Masonry – Hot-weather mortar work and bricklaying present special challenges. Knowledgeable, professional contractors are required; masonry pros should follow ACI 530.1-92/ASCE 6-92/TMS 602-92 Specifications for Masonry Structures.
  • Overworking can cause breakdowns – Construction workers can suffer job-related exhaustion. Your construction equipment can too. Review and post machinery limitations so all operators are aware. Breakdowns caused by overusing construction equipment can void warranties.
  • Proper storage – Groups of bored preteens see construction sites as amusement parks full of rides. Remove all keys and when possible, store equipment in a dry, covered area. Just a little dew can corrode and rust equipment systems. It also takes a toll on operating efficiency.
  • Take the time to save money – It’s tempting to add a bit of overtime to finish a job quicker. (We tell ourselves we can sleep later.) But equipment failures can cost more and waste greater time than bringing the job in under-schedule.
  • Use the right tools – Construction employees are creative. But when we modify or juryrig equipment to make-do, it can cause problems. Encourage project workers to use the right equipment for the right job and to avoid mix-and-matching accessories.

Increased use of technology is driving our industry. Contact Construction Monitor for ways to save money using lead-generating construction data.

…And keep it cool this summer.

Construction Safety Tips for 2020

construction safety tips

The COVID-19 pandemic will continue to pose cross-contamination and exposure risks for the construction industry (indeed, every industry) for potentially years to come. Construction supervisors and owner/operators will need to provide education that defines new workplace safety standards for the remainder of 2020. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has released its construction safety tips and guidelines for post-coronavirus:

COVID-19 Guidance for the Construction Workforce

  1. Discourage space invaders – Encourage workers to avoid physical contact and maintain 6-foot distancing where possible. This includes inside jobsite trailers.
  2. Encourage workers to report any safety and health concerns immediately.
  3. Face-to-face meetings – Keep jobsite meetings short and reinforce distancing practices.
  4. Keep cool – Offer shaded rest areas, plenty of water stations, and switch to nighttime work shifts if dangerously hot days pose serious health risks.
  5. Masking – Mask-wearing may be recommended but mandates are unlikely to be enforceable. Allow workers to wear masks or not unless based on community/legal requirements.
  6. Portable toilet sanitation – Construction jobsite toilet cleaning and disinfection should be increased and hand sanitizers provided. Hand sanitizers should be refilled/replaced frequently.
  7. PPE – Personal protective equipment should be used when needed, as always. Provide training in proper PPE use.
  8. Promote personal hygiene and “respiratory etiquette” – Coughs and sneezes should always be covered. If access to soap and water is limited, provide hand-sanitizer stations throughout the jobsite.
  9. Put it in writing – Construction safety diligence will be more important than ever before. Be able to show documentation that construction safety training has been completed by all workers. Document instances of best-efforts in reducing cross-contamination and disease exposure risks. Record days/times workers left the job due to illness.
  10. Use EPA-approved cleaning products – Cleaning products should meet standards for SARS-CoV-2. Alcohol-based wipes should be used on shared tools before/after use (while following manufacturer instructions for cleaning).
  11. Workaholics are no longer jobsite super-heroes – Reinforce policies to discourage workers to stay home if they are sick.

Construction Monitor LLC increases the efficiency for thousands of construction industry-related companies nationwide. To learn more about our technology tools and strategic partnerships, contact Construction Monitor today.