Stand Down To Prevent Falls: Construction Safety 2021

construction safety

May 3-7, 2021, was the 8th annual National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) promotes this week to encourage construction safety 24/7 all year, every year.

Falls are the greatest challenge to construction safety. Injuries dramatically impact workers’ lives. But families and businesses also suffer when there’s a fall-related accident.

Employers are responsible for providing safe workplaces. We also have a responsibility to provide safety education to employees at every project site. OSHA’s function is to set safety standards and guidelines for workplace safety.

What You Can Do To Promote Construction Safety

In addition to reducing fall hazards and providing safety information, another valuable measure to increase construction safety is to encourage workers to report any fall or other safety risks they see. A Safety Stand-Down is an opportunity and not an obligation because most of us feel responsible for employee safety.

Who Participates In a Safety Stand-Down?

Project managers can take advantage of this opportunity to discuss project-specific hazards and risks. It’s also a good time to document rescue plans.

Construction safety programs or “toolbox talks” can be sponsored or supported by:

  • Construction companies of every size
  • Employee interest organizations
  • General industry employers
  • Government entities
  • Highway construction companies
  • Industry institutes
  • Safety equipment manufacturers
  • Sub-/independent contractors
  • Trade associations
  • Unions

Go to the Stop-Falls Events site to learn where and when programs are available in your region or contact your regional manager. If your company has developed a fall-prevention program, needs additional information, or has suggestions, you can email oshastanddown@dol.gov or access social media sites with #StandDown4Safety.

Construction Monitor genuinely cares about on-the-job safety. If you have safety-related information we should share with construction employers or other industry-related businesses, please email Construction Monitor and we’ll promptly reply.

Building Permit Data Management

You can process large amounts of permit data through Construction Monitor’s API or automated weekly data dumps via secure FTP. To learn more, call 800-925-6085 (international 435-586-1205) or contact us.

Construction Safety Checklist

construction safety checklist

The American National Standards Institute and the American Society of Safety Professionals (ANSI/ASSP) revised the A10 Construction and Demolition Operations standards in addition to Fall Protection and Restraint (Z359) guidelines. We should follow their construction safety protocols.

The 2020 construction safety standards revisions were chaired by Richard Hislop. “This is more than putting a cover over a hole or placing a barricade around a hazard. This is about creating a process to manage safety.”

Basic Checklist for Construction Safety

Construction safety policies’ importance can’t be over-emphasized. Construction safety should be owned by everyone in the industry and on the job.

To download the complete form, go to Get the Checklist. Some of its project construction safety tips include:

  1. Appoint a safety/health supervisor.
  2. Develop a health/safety plan and communicate it to employees.
  3. Ensure employees are trained/aware of hazards/controls, safety/health rules required by the project-specific safety and health plan.
  4. Ensure compliance with ANSI/ASSP A10.33-2020; hazardous conditions are promptly abated.
  5. Provide employees with personal protective equipment. Ensure they are trained in its use.
  6. Train employees to safely operate machinery, tools, vehicles, and equipment.
  7. Notify workers they must be fit for duty/free from impairment from medications, illegal substances/alcohol. Assess fitness for duty before each shift.
  8. Recommend appropriate discipline if employees violate safety/health rules and provide recognition for employees who achieve safety and health goals and demonstrate valuable health and safety behaviors.
  9. Conduct/manage daily safety/health inspections. Document/correct hazardous conditions.
  10. Inspect machinery/tools, vehicles/equipment before use at the beginning of each shift to ensure they are free from hazards.
  11. Ensure workers report injuries and have access to first aid supplies.
  12. Document all work-related injuries/illnesses/near misses. Investigate/implement preventive construction safety measures.
  13. Train workers in the emergency action plan (evacuation, etc.)
  14. Stop work if imminent danger is present.
  15. Ensure employees have access to water/bathrooms.

Construction Monitor Increases Profits With Building Permit Data

You’re already managing pandemic protocols to keep workers safe. Hopefully, that’s a temporary process. But our industry’s drive to promote project safety will continue forever.

Make this the year you build your reputation for construction safety; you’ll become the company talented recruits want to join.

Construction Monitor helps companies like yours build business. And we genuinely care about your marketing outcomes. Let us know how building permits have increased your profits. And if you don’t know how to use building permit data, ask us.

Construction Safety Tips for 2020

construction safety tips

The COVID-19 pandemic will continue to pose cross-contamination and exposure risks for the construction industry (indeed, every industry) for potentially years to come. Construction supervisors and owner/operators will need to provide education that defines new workplace safety standards for the remainder of 2020. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has released its construction safety tips and guidelines for post-coronavirus:

COVID-19 Guidance for the Construction Workforce

  1. Discourage space invaders – Encourage workers to avoid physical contact and maintain 6-foot distancing where possible. This includes inside jobsite trailers.
  2. Encourage workers to report any safety and health concerns immediately.
  3. Face-to-face meetings – Keep jobsite meetings short and reinforce distancing practices.
  4. Keep cool – Offer shaded rest areas, plenty of water stations, and switch to nighttime work shifts if dangerously hot days pose serious health risks.
  5. Masking – Mask-wearing may be recommended but mandates are unlikely to be enforceable. Allow workers to wear masks or not unless based on community/legal requirements.
  6. Portable toilet sanitation – Construction jobsite toilet cleaning and disinfection should be increased and hand sanitizers provided. Hand sanitizers should be refilled/replaced frequently.
  7. PPE – Personal protective equipment should be used when needed, as always. Provide training in proper PPE use.
  8. Promote personal hygiene and “respiratory etiquette” – Coughs and sneezes should always be covered. If access to soap and water is limited, provide hand-sanitizer stations throughout the jobsite.
  9. Put it in writing – Construction safety diligence will be more important than ever before. Be able to show documentation that construction safety training has been completed by all workers. Document instances of best-efforts in reducing cross-contamination and disease exposure risks. Record days/times workers left the job due to illness.
  10. Use EPA-approved cleaning products – Cleaning products should meet standards for SARS-CoV-2. Alcohol-based wipes should be used on shared tools before/after use (while following manufacturer instructions for cleaning).
  11. Workaholics are no longer jobsite super-heroes – Reinforce policies to discourage workers to stay home if they are sick.

Construction Monitor LLC increases the efficiency for thousands of construction industry-related companies nationwide. To learn more about our technology tools and strategic partnerships, contact Construction Monitor today.