Why You Should A/B Test Updates to Your Construction Website

Small improvements to your website can make the difference between a potential construction client contacting you or clicking away. By A/B testing your website updates, you’ll see what changes are bringing good results so you can capitalize on them even more.

Get the Results You Want

The goal of any website update is to improve your metrics, whether that means lowering your bounce rate (the rate of visitors who view one page, then leave), encouraging more visitor engagement or increasing leads. Especially if you’ve paid a professional designer, it’s easy to assume any changes are for the better. That’s not always the case, though.

An A/B test shows you which updates are helping and which aren’t. A major change in layout might end up confusing your visitors. If they can’t find the content they want quickly, you’ll get fewer leads. Updates that are good for aesthetics aren’t always good for business. Considering how important eye-catching images are on a construction website, you might think a slick-looking image carousel or hero image of a recent building project could only help. If you find these features increase your bounce rate, though, you’ll know to look for something more engaging for your homepage.

Quantify Your Improvements

Even if you know which recent updates have improved your website metrics, it’s helpful to have some hard data on those improvements. A/B tests let you collect data on both the old and the updated version of each part of your website. If you spot a change that’s getting especially good results, you’ll know where to focus your efforts.

Maybe your new homepage features a downloadable case study on your recent multi-story car park project and you find it’s bringing you a lot more leads. You might want to make that case study even more prominent on your homepage or try out other types of lead magnets. A guide on budgeting a commercial construction project might bring more leads still.

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Incorporating Consumer Trends into Your Marketing Plan

Paying attention to what consumers want isn’t only useful for discovering new markets. It can also help you develop a marketing plan that’s fully in tune with your ideal clients’ needs and interests.

Do Your Research

To get real value from using consumer trends in your marketing, you need to know what the relevant trends are. Your intuition about what’s trending is a good place to start, but make sure you can back it up with hard data before you incorporate it into your marketing. Maybe you’ve heard demand for co-working spaces is booming, but are you sure that’s true for your area? Review the market data, interview suppliers, and hold focus groups to really get to know if a trend you’ve spotted is worth paying attention.

Focus specifically on your target market. Millennials looking to build their first homes set very different trends than older couples who want to remodel their homes for convenience as they age.

Review Your Whole Plan

Every part of your marketing plan can take inspiration from consumer trends. New trends can open up new target markets. For example, you might take advantage of the growing escape room trend by putting together a package detailing how your company can build one. With the ever-increasing concern for environmental sustainability, it’s worth emphasizing your eco-friendly materials and methods in your marketing material.

Look to trends to guide you on where and how to market. Instead of sending postcards with a single marketing message, include a QR code that ties your message into a larger digital campaign. On social media, pay attention to what types of posts are trending.

Trends can also influence your voice. Today’s consumers are generally put off by formal, traditional advertising and drawn to transparency and authenticity, which calls for a more conversational voice. Style trends matter, too. Make sure your website and other marketing material doesn’t look like something from the mid-90s or your prospects might wonder if your construction methods are equally out of date.

Why Defining a Unique Selling Proposition is Crucial to Your Success

You might not be the only construction company in town, but you are the only one with your exact skill set, experience, and personality. By defining a unique selling proposition (USP) that expresses those qualities, you let your potential clients know you’re the company for them.

Attract to Your Ideal Clients

Your success depends on finding clients who appreciate your skills and pay top dollar for them. To attract those clients, you need to market in a way that stands out to them and speaks directly to them. Your USP helps you do that. If you want more luxury spa hotel clients, your USP might focus on the mood your facilities create or the high-tech amenities you build in. If eco-friendly home upgrades are your thing and you love working with families, you might have “green home renovations for eco-conscious families” as your USP.

Increase Your Profit

Specialists nearly always command higher prices than generalists. By positioning your company as the go-to source for a particular service, you can charge a premium for your work to maximize your profits.

Your specialist status also reduces the perceived risk of working with you. It’s natural to assume a company with a focus on building refrigerated warehouses will do a better job on one than a general commercial storage construction company. When your clients feel secure in your ability to deliver top quality, they’ll be more willing to pay a higher price for it.

Enjoy Greater Customer Loyalty

Your USP is “unique” precisely because no one does it quite like you. When your clients feel they can’t get the same service elsewhere, they’ll be happy to come back to you for their next project. That’s especially valuable if you’re targeting property developers or other professionals who’ll be investing in projects for years to come. As an extra benefit, your loyal clients will be more likely to recommend you when a friend or colleague needs the services you specialize in.  

Do You Really Need to Develop a Buyer Persona?

Creating buyer personas helps you better understand your ideal clients so you can market to them more effectively and spot future business opportunities. They aren’t the only way to define your audience, though.

How Buyer Personas Help Guide Your Business

A detailed profile of the type of client you want to work with makes it easier to understand your target clients as fully fleshed-out individuals. You’re no longer targeting “property developers,” but 45-year-old John who has personal wants, needs, interests, likes, and dislikes that go beyond construction. With this information, you can create marketing that connects with your ideal clients on a deeper level and sets you apart from the competition.

The insight your buyer personas provide helps you decide where your future clients spend their time and what they do there, so you’ll know how to reach them and turn them into leads. If they’re more likely to be on Facebook than LinkedIn, it’s clear where your advertising money should go. Developing future services is also easier when you have a good idea of what your target clients are interested in and what they have and haven’t been satisfied with in past construction projects.

Other Ways to Understand Your Audience

If buyer personas don’t sound like your thing, get to know your target audience better first by defining their problems, then by deciding what solutions you can offer for them. Start by gathering basic information on your target audience. If you want to work with property developers who invest in multifamily housing, find out approximately how many of them are in your area.

Next, consider their goals and challenges, and what they’re ultimately hoping to achieve with their projects. Maybe they’re looking for distinctive architectural features that command higher prices or they’re interested in alternative construction methods that allow for lower-cost housing that sells faster. To better define your niche, look at where your target clients’ needs and wants overlap with your skills.